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 SEPARATION OF
CHURCH AND STATE

The Bill of Rights
The first ten Amendments (Bill of Rights) were ratified effective December 15, 1791. Amendment I—Freedom of Religion, Speech, and the Press; Rights of Assembly and Petition reads as follows:

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibit the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

It seems among believers in conservative and fundamental circles across America a lack of understanding exists concerning our Biblical as well as Constitutional responsibility to stand against the liberal attacks on our country. Repeatedly I’ve heard the statement there is no place for politics in the church. With that is a willingness to swallow hook, line, and sinker the outright perversion of the founding fathers’ original intent. That is especially apparent concerning the phrase, “Separation of Church and State.” Dr. David Gibbs in Understanding the Constitution writes: It should be carefully noted that the First Amendment says absolutely nothing about “the separation of church and state.” In fact, that phrase is found nowhere in the Constitution or in the Bill of Rights. “Separation” was a doctrine imposed on America by the United States Supreme Court in a decision, “Everson vs. Board of Education,” interpreting the Establishment Clause in 1947—the middle of the twentieth century, nearly two hundred years after the Clause was drafted….

This phrase, which is so prevalent in modern court decisions and which is alleged so frequently to represent a legitimate constitutional principle, was first used in 1802 by President Thomas Jefferson in an exchange of letters with the Baptist Association of Danbury, Connecticut, in order to assure the Baptists that the government would never be permitted to interfere with the church. Yet, against all reason, this phrase from a letter written by a man who took no part in the drafting of the First Amendment, has been seized upon by our courts for the past fifty years to deny citizens many of the rights that were once understood to be protected under our Constitution….

In referring to this “wall of separation” Jefferson was borrowing from the metaphor of Roger Williams, a fellow Baptist and Rhode Island’s champion of religious freedom. Williams had previously written of “a gap in the hedge or wall of separation between the garden of the church and the wilderness of the world.”…

The Founders’ own understanding of the Establishment Clause does not support the modern view of a complete church-state separation, which is really interpreted by modern courts to mean a separation of God and government.

Tragically, God’s people have abdicated their Biblical responsibility to be salt and light. The founders believed that God and His Word were absolutely essential to the governing of this nation.

 

 

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